Fast Omicron Case Transmission, Followed Case Drop Speed

Spokesperson for the Covid-19 Task Force at Sebelas Maret University Hospital (UNS), Dr. Tonang Dwi Ardiyanto.
Spokesperson for the Covid-19 Task Force at Sebelas Maret University Hospital (UNS), Dr. Tonang Dwi Ardiyanto.

JAKARTA — Health experts have a better understanding of the patterns and characteristics of the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Although the transmission speed of the Omicron variant is faster than that of Delta, there is hope that the daily Covid-19 report will slow down more quickly without having to treat many patients or suffer fatalities.

“Without intending to be grateful for a disaster, we are grateful that even though the transmission rate is fast, the number of patient care in hospitals is still significant below the Delta wave in July 2021,” said Spokesperson for the Covid-19 Task Force at Sebelas Maret University (UNS) Hospital, Dr Tonang Dwi. Ardiyanto told reporters in Jakarta, Friday (25/2/2022).

The Omicron BA.1 subvariant, according to Tonang, has the characteristics of rapidly developing in the respiratory tract, but slowly developing in the lungs. This is what should be suspected as a factor in the symptoms experienced by patients infected with Omicron, which tend to be milder than the Delta variant.

Scroll to read

Scroll to read

“But we should be worried about the Omicron BA.2 subvariant whose developmental ability in the lungs can be close to that of Delta’s,” said Tonang.

According to him, the average degree of disease severity in patients infected with Omicron is indeed lighter than last year’s Delta variant. However, we cautioned against the Omicron BA.2 subvariant. Even so, he hopes, with many gaining natural immunity from infection and adding more and more being vaccinated, the variant of the virus will not develop any further.

“I also believe that if the new variant dominates, the previous variant will slowly decrease. But we really don’t need to be stuck with Omicron and Delta. Because all of them are the same Covid-19 virus. It’s just that all variants of this virus are at risk of making patients with severe symptoms,” said Tonang.

Currently, the number of cases being treated at UNS hospitals has slightly increased. It’s just that, he continued, when compared to the previous Delta waves, it was relatively lower.

“At the time of the last Delta wave, we converted more than half of the beds, almost 70 percent were provided for handling Covid-19. Currently, only about 40 percent have been prepared and it’s not full yet,” said Tonang.